Category Archives: Recovery

Tyranny with your Dinner?

Out in the wider world, things are slowly getting back to normal, almost:

  • Buses are back to the normal routine of getting on the front end of the bus and paying the fare, but the white line beyond which passengers are not permitted to stand when the bus is in motion has been relocated to keep passengers from standing too close to the driver.
  • Museums are reopening, but one must make a reservation before visiting.
  • Blink, the gym I used to frequent before the emergency, has reopened.  But the showers are closed, and one is encouraged to make a reservation.  I can resume my membership, or keep it suspended until the end of October.  I think I’ll wait.

Meanwhile, a proper meal inside a restaurant is still prohibited in New York City.  There’s outdoor dining, which is OK while the weather is nice, if one doesn’t get caught in a public protest (‘shame on you for flaunting your dining privilege!’), but will likely not be so wonderful come November.  One can also cheat a bit, and go outside the city (Hoboken is a few minutes from Greenwich Village on the PATH train), but that’s a so-so substitute.

Uncle Andy (Governor Cuomo) and Uncle Bill (Mayor DeBlasio) were maundering earlier this month about how resuming indoor dining would be ‘too risky.’  After raging at President Trump and insisting that they would make decisions driven by science and data, they fumbled about uselessly.  Governor Cuomo feared that indoor dining would bring about a resurgence of Covid… unless, perhaps, we allocated 4,000 police officers to mind people’s behavior in restaurants.  (In fairness, this is the same Uncle Andy who predicted dire consequences without 30,000 ventilators for the anticipated Covid victims of New York State.)  While I first came across this item on a conservative news feed, I checked a couple of more mainstream news sources to make sure it was real.

The Labor Day weekend felt close to normal.  My wife and I had lunch in Little Italy: there were fewer people in the streets than in past years, but it was comfortably busy.  We could get a seat on the subway returning home, but not a socially distant seat like in past weeks. 

A couple of days ago, Uncle Andy relented and put forth a plan for indoor dining in New York City, to take effect 30 September.  Restaurants would be limited to 25% capacity, with tables at least six feet apart, no seating at the bar, temperature checks at the door, and masks required to be worn when not seated.

But the worst part, to my view, is that one member of each party must identify himself for contact tracing.  If someone visits the same restaurant and later turns up positive, the Covid police will show up at my door demanding to know who I’ve been hanging out with for the past month.

The icky part is that restaurants with indoor and outdoor dining spaces (October is still mostly nice for outdoor dining in New York City) will probably collect contract tracing information from everyone, not just the indoor diners.  Choosing to eat outdoors to avoid contact tracing probably won’t work.

Oh, yes: New York City will provide ‘a team of 400 enforcement personnel’ to ensure compliance.  Not quite 4,000 cops, but it’s still onerous and stupid.

The saddest part is the response from the restaurant community reported on the New York State Web page.  The Restaurant Association and the owners of various restaurants are unanimous in praising and thanking Uncle Andy for his wise leadership.  Alas, he has them all by the throat.

Let’s End This

One of the reasons I don’t write more regularly is that I don’t like to repeat myself.  Too much of what I read on current affairs is people banging the same drum about systemic racism, or taxation being theft, or whatever.

But I’ll repeat myself a bit here.

We need to end this emergency soon.

The virus is a force of nature at this point: the government cannot protect us from it.  The one thing that the government might be able to do is forestall a disaster such as happened in China, Italy, and Spain, where so many people got sick at once as to overwhelm the health care system.  It doesn’t take that many people for that to happen: if 1% of a community got sick and descended on its hospitals all at once, the result would be worse than anything seen so far.

That, fortunately, hasn’t happened, although for a handful of New York City hospitals, it got close.  The number of new cases is starting to level off, and the number of hospitalizations is dropping, never having gotten close to the available space.  The Navy hospital ship Comfort, having arrived in New York City at the end of March to supplement available hospital space, is leaving, having treated a grand total of 179.

About a week ago, Governor Cuomo extended the emergency two weeks, to 15 May.  And if current trends hold, that’s a good place to start.  I don’t expect all the restrictions to be lifted at once, and even if they were, the public would likely still avoid large gatherings like sporting events. But I’m hoping that a month from now, I can take my wife to dinner.

Every state is different, and under our republic, decisions like this are made on the state level.  New York has suffered, and is recovering, but for other states, the worst may be yet to come.  And for some states, ‘the worst’ may not be that severe to begin with.

43 of the 50 states implemented some form of stay-at-home order in response to the coronavirus.  At the time, we weren’t sure what would happen.  We didn’t have, as I sometimes like to say at work, the dimensions of the problem.

Meanwhile, there are the seven states, and Sweden, that didn’t force everyone to stay at home.  Most of the states in question are sparsely populated, but Sweden isn’t that sparse, and has some major cities.  Even though they didn’t have Uncle Andy’s guidance, they didn’t get whomped like New York City. 

Our understanding now is still incomplete, but way better than what we had a month ago.  To those who say, ‘the science should determine when it’s safe to reopen,’ I’m compelled to point out that any decision of this nature is an exercise in risks and statistics.  (Statistics is a science, too!)  Even deciding to wait for a vaccine is a statistical exercise, one that should properly consider the secondary effects of prolonging the emergency for another year.

So now is a good time to think about lifting the restrictions we’ve been under for the past month, based on the facts on the ground.  Mid-May is a good place to start for New York; other places might take longer, and some may be ready to restart, taking baby steps at first, now.

Let’s get our dignity back, and get back to work.